Skip Navigation

Living Donation

I am also interested in being a living donor, where do I go for more information?

When you register as an organ, eye and tissue donor with Donate Life Maryland, you are choosing to donate your organs and tissues after you die. There is also a living donation process for kidney and liver transplants.

Living organ donation is a viable option for many transplant patients as there are more persons waiting for a transplant than there are donors. In Maryland, there are two transplant programs that facilitate living donation, the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center and The Transplant Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center.

Choosing to become a living kidney or living donor is a major decision. Health professionals at both the Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center and The Transplant Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center can help walk you through the process.

Once someone has expressed interest in being a living donor, they will work with an assigned coordinator at their chosen transplant center to guide them through the evaluation.

Living Donation Process Overview:

  1. Consent process
  2. Evaluation process
  3. Surgical procedures
  4. Medical and psychosocial risks
  5. Post-donation follow-up

For More Information, Contact:

The Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Transplant Center
To become a living kidney donor, call 410-614-9345.
For more information visit the Hopkins Medicine Living Donors Website.
If you have questions about live liver donations, please call 410-614-2989 for more information.

The Transplant Program at the University of Maryland Medical Center
For living kidney donor information visit the UMM Kidney Living Donor Website.
For living liver donor information visit the UMM Liver Living Donor Website.
For additional information about living kidney and liver donations, please call the Transplant office at 410-328-5408.

Statistics

23,715 transplants were from deceased donors in 2014.  Similarly, it was the first time more than 23,000 deceased-donor transplants were done in a year.

See More Statistics

Common Questions

View All Questions

 
Back to top